black mamas matter

BLACK HISTORY MONTH AND BEYOND

We may be nearing the end of Black History Month, but the influence of Black folks in birth work and every other aspect of society continues 365 days a year. Black History Month is a time to recognize the pivotal role that Black folks have played all throughout history, and celebrate the richness they have cultivated, despite society’s continuous efforts to hide their accomplishments. However, it’s not enough to stop at just Black History Month. We need to continue celebrating Black folks in the past and present as well as making sure that our doula practices are accessible to Black parents. For us, creating equity is a continuous and intentional act of centering the voices and needs of marginalized communities in our doula work.

When it comes to our particular field of work as doulas, if you haven’t seen the statistics that have been zooming across news outlets and social media: Black parents are dying at 3-4 times the rate of white parents, and Black babies are twice as likely to die during childbirth as white babies. Furthermore:

“Education and income offer little protection. In fact, a black woman with an advanced degree is more likely to lose her baby than a white woman with less than an eighth-grade education.”  

-Linda Villarosa, New York Times

It’s not okay. And it’s horrifying. There’s no explanation/reason that could ever make this statistic okay or any less devastating. Black parents deserve better. 

(To learn more about HOW this happens, be sure to read this article from Lamaze International. They do a great job of breaking down the statistics, the vibrant history of Black Midwives in the US, and their importance in modern America.)

That being said, it’s not enough to simply state that we’re allies of Black parents. “Ally” isn’t just a label that we can pin to our chests and call it a day. It’s a constant commitment to equity, growth, and advocacy. And beyond that, a promise to uplift justice, action, healing, and mindfulness. A simple label won’t absolve our communities of the weight of the maternal mortality crisis, or the racism that still exists in every aspect of our society. That weight is inter-generational, centuries in the making, and has existed since Africans were first brought across the sea against their will as part of the Transatlantic Slave Trade.

Here at Tree Town Doulas we want to say thank you to all the Black birth workers that have paved the way, from Margaret Charles Smith to Racha Tahani Lawler. If you’re a Black birth worker and would like to connect to gain experience, exchange resources/networks, or more please don’t hesitate to reach out! 

If you’re a non-Black birth worker committed to change but don’t know where to start: Check out this article that amplifies the words of DONA’s Black doulas themselves. This article might be a few years old, but it’s still applicable. An oldie but goodie.

To Black people who are looking to be parents and are looking for a doula for their birthing process, we will actively work to hear you and center your needs. We understand that we’re not a fully Black staff, so if you’re in southeast Michigan, below is a list of Black birth workers and parenting groups in the area. 

Black Birthworkers and Parenting Groups in Southeast Michigan

Our Village: African American Expectant and New Mom Group

4260 Plymouth Rd, Ann Arbor MI 481905

Contact: Mnscott@umich.edu

Link for their facebook page

Link for their schedule/event page

 

Black Mothers Breastfeeding Socials through Washtenaw County WIC Breastfeeding Support: 

WIC office, 555 Towner St, Ypsilanti MI 48198

Contact: (734) 544-6800 or message their facebook page

A lovely article about their work

 

Mosaic Midwifery Collective

Homebirth midwives: Heather Robinson, Cynthia Jackson, and Jahmamma Selasie

Contact: mosaicmidwiferycollective@gmail.com or call (248) 965-9539

Main website: www.mosaicmidwiferycollective.com

Link to their facebook page

 

Organizations dedicated to professional, childcare, educational, safety, mental and reproductive health support for Black parents:

WIN Network Detroit

Contact: info@winnetworkdetroit.org, or call (313) 874-4581

Main website: winnetwork.org 

Their page of resources for parents

 

Focus: Hope

1400 Oakman Boulevard, Detroit MI 48238

Contact: (313) 494-5500

Main website: focushope.edu

 

Mothering Justice

777 Livernois, Ferndale MI 48220

Main website: motheringjustice.org